Monday, May 12, 2014

Clash of the Tartans: Celtic Ale and Mead Competition



Celtic Ale and Mead Competition

This is a themed competition. Only the following categories will be accepted:

ALES:

9A. Scottish Light 60/-
9B. Scottish Heavy 70/-
9C. Scottish Export 80/-
9D. Irish Red Ale
9E. Strong Scotch Ale
13A. Dry Stout
22C. Wood-Aged Beer (Base styles listed above)
23. Specialty Beer (Historical ales of Scottish or Irish origin)

MEADS:

24A. Dry Mead
24B. Semi-Sweet Mead
24C. Sweet Mead
25A. Cyser
25B. Pyment
25C. Other Fruit Melomel
26A. Metheglin
26B. Braggot
26C. Open Category Mead

SPECIAL INSTRUCTIONS: READ CAREFULLY!

Entries for category 22C will be accepted only if the base style is 9A, 9B, 9C, 9D, 9E, or 13A. A base style MUST be specified on the entry form. Wood varietal should be specified (eg. Oak, French Oak, Toasted Oak).

Entries for category 23 are limited to ales of historical significance to the Celtic regions. Supplemental information explaining the significance, properties, and ingredients of the ale MUST be included with the entry.

All mead entries must specify carbonation level, strength, and sweetness. Honey varietal may be specified if desired.

Entries for category 25C must also specify the type of fruit used.

Entries for category 26A MUST specify the spices used.

Entries for category 26B may specify type of malt or a beer base style if desired.

Entries for category 26C MUST include supplemental information explaining the significance, properties, ingredients and/or experimental nature of the mead.

HOW TO ENTER:
Fill out an entry form: Available Here and Bottle labels: Available Here for each entry.
For each entry, submit two bottles that meet the following guidelines:
BEER and MEAD entries must be in bottles that hold a minimum of 10 ounces in volume, and that will fit in a standard case box slot. The measurements of a standard case box slot are 2.75 inches long x 2.75 inches wide x 9 inches high (7 cm x 7 cm x 22.9 cm). Bottles may be of any color and must be free of ink, paint, or paper labeling other than competition entry label. Obliterate any lettering or graphics on the cap with a permanent black marker. Bottles with Grölsch-type swing tops and 22 oz Bomber bottles are not allowed.
Corked bottles and odd-shaped bottles are acceptable as long as they can fit in a standard case box slot (2.75 inches L x 2.75 in W x 9 in H; 7 cm x 7 cm x 22.9 cm). Bottles with raised lettering are acceptable if they fit in a standard case box slot.
Bottles not meeting the above requirements will be disqualified. Entry fees will not be refunded for disqualified entries.
Attach bottle IDs to bottles with rubber bands.
Entry fee is $5 for the first entry and $3 for each additional entry.
Make Checks Payable to: Rimrock Brewers Guild


Entries may be dropped off or mailed to:
Canyon Creek Brewing
3060 Gabel Rd
Billings, MT 59102
ATTN: Rimrock Brewers Guild


Entries will be accepted starting at 11am, Thursday, June 12. The deadline for entry is 8pm, Thursday, June 19, 2014.


If you are mailing your entry, find instructions on how to ship bottles here in the article "how to pack your beer".


Thank you for considering our competition, and Good Luck!

Clash of the Tartans will take place during the Yellowstone Highland Games

@ZOO Montana June 21, 2014

Sunday, March 23, 2014

United We Brew: American Ales Competition Results


First Place:     David Farmer     (14c)Imperial IPA  Truth Serum

Second Place: Robert Hemphill  (21a)H,S,V  Chips and Salsa Cerveza

Third Place:    Dustin Strong     (7b) California Common  Frozen Pipe California Lager



Thanks to all who participated!

Results will be published in Zymurgy. Score sheets will be sent via USPS by 3/29/2014.

Monday, January 20, 2014

American Ales Competition Entrant Instructions

PLEASE READ INSTRUCTIONS CAREFULLY! Failure to comply with category limitations or request for additional entry information will result in disqualification of your entry.

It is the responsibility of the entrant to choose the correct category, list special ingredients, and attach supplemental information when required. Judges will not make assumptions about ingredients or research entries for the entrant.


United We Brew: American Ales Competition
Saturday, March 22, 2014

This is a themed competition. Only the following categories will be accepted:

1A. Light American Lager
1B. Standard American Lager
1C. Premium American Lager
2C. Classic American Pilsner
4A. Dark American Lager
6A. Cream Ale
6B. Blonde Ale
6D. American Wheat or Rye Beer
7B. California Common Beer
10A. American Pale Ale
10B. American Amber Ale
10C. American Brown Ale
13E. American Stout
14B. American IPA
14C. Imperial IPA
19C. American Barleywine
21A. Spice, Herb, or Vegetable Beer
22B. Other Smoked Beer
22C. Wood-aged Beer


SPECIAL INSTRUCTIONS: READ CAREFULLY!

Entries for category 21A, 22B, and 22C will be accepted only if the base style is 1A, 1B, 1C, 2C, 4A, 6A, 6B, 6D, 7B, 10A, 10B, 10C, 13E, 14B, 14C, or 19C. A base style MUST be specified on the entry form. Wood varietal should be specified (eg. Oak, French Oak, Toasted Oak).


Entries for category 21A MUST specify the spices, herbs, or vegetables used.

Entries for category 6D should specify wheat, rye, or both.


HOW TO ENTER:

Fill out an entry form: Available Here and Bottle labels: Available Here for each entry.

For each entry, submit two bottles that meet the following guidelines:


BEER entries must be in bottles that hold a minimum of 10 ounces in volume, and that will fit in a standard case box slot.  The measurements of a standard case box slot are 2.75 inches long x 2.75 inches wide x 9 inches high (7 cm x 7 cm x 22.9 cm).  Bottles may be of any color and must be free of ink, paint, or paper labeling other than competition entry label.  Obliterate any lettering or graphics on the cap with a permanent black marker. Bottles with Grölsch-type swing tops and 22 oz Bomber bottles are not allowed.
Corked bottles and odd-shaped bottles are acceptable as long as they can fit in a standard case box slot (2.75 inches L x 2.75 in W x 9 in H; 7 cm x 7 cm x 22.9 cm).  Bottles with raised lettering are acceptable if they fit in a standard case box slot.


Bottles not meeting the above requirements will be disqualified. Entry fees will not be refunded for disqualified entries.

Attach bottle IDs to bottles with rubber bands.

Entry fee is $5 for the first entry and $2 for each additional entry.

Entries may be dropped off or mailed to:

Canyon Creek Brewing
3060 Gabel Rd,  Billings, MT 59102
ATTN: Rimrock Brewers Guild

Entries will be accepted starting at 2PM, Wednesday, March 12. The deadline for entry is 8PM, Wednesday, March 19, 2014.

If you are mailing your entry, find instructions on how to ship bottles here in the article "How to pack your beer".

Thank you for considering our competition, and Good Luck!

United We Brew: American Ales Competition

For entry information, click here.

Questions? Contact rimrock.brewers.guild@gmail.com

Sunday, April 28, 2013

Yellowstone Highland Games Celtic Ale and Mead Competition



For entry information: Click here

For questions, email: rimrock.brewers.guild@gmail.com

Celtic Ale and Mead Competition Entrant Instructions

PLEASE READ INSTRUCTIONS CAREFULLY! Failure to comply with category limitations or request for additional entry information will result in disqualification of your entry.

It is the responsibility of the entrant to choose the correct category, list special ingredients, and attach supplemental information when required. Judges will not make assumptions about ingredients or research entries for the entrant.


Celtic Ale and Mead Competition
Saturday, July 27, 2013
Zoo Montana

This is a themed competition. Only the following categories will be accepted:

ALES:

9A. Scottish Light 60/-
9B. Scottish Heavy 70/-
9C. Scottish Export 80/-
9D. Irish Red Ale
9E. Strong Scotch Ale
13A. Dry Stout
22C. Wood-Aged Beer (Base styles listed above)
23. Specialty Beer (Historical ales of Scottish or Irish origin)

MEADS:

24A. Dry Mead
24B. Semi-Sweet Mead
24C. Sweet Mead
25A. Cyser
25B. Pyment
25C. Other Fruit Melomel
26A. Metheglin
26B. Braggot
26C. Open Category Mead

SPECIAL INSTRUCTIONS: READ CAREFULLY!

Entries for category 22C will be accepted only if the base style is 9A, 9B, 9C, 9D, 9E, or 13A. A base style MUST be specified on the entry form. Wood varietal should be specified (eg. Oak, French Oak, Toasted Oak).

Entries for category 23 are limited to ales of historical significance to the Celtic regions. Supplemental information explaining the significance, properties, and ingredients of the ale MUST be included with the entry.

All mead entries must specify carbonation level, strength, and sweetness. Honey varietal may be specified if desired.

Entries for category 25C must also specify the type of fruit used.

Entries for category 26A MUST specify the spices used.

Entries for category 26B may specify type of malt or a beer base style if desired.

Entries for category 26C MUST include supplemental information explaining the significance, properties, ingredients and/or experimental nature of the mead.


HOW TO ENTER:

Fill out an entry form: Available Here and Bottle labels: Available Here for each entry.

For each entry, submit two bottles that meet the following guidelines:


BEER and MEAD entries must be in bottles that hold a minimum of 10 ounces in volume, and that will fit in a standard case box slot.  The measurements of a standard case box slot are 2.75 inches long x 2.75 inches wide x 9 inches high (7 cm x 7 cm x 22.9 cm).  Bottles may be of any color and must be free of ink, paint, or paper labeling other than competition entry label.  Obliterate any lettering or graphics on the cap with a permanent black marker. Bottles with Grölsch-type swing tops and 22 oz Bomber bottles are not allowed.
Corked bottles and odd-shaped bottles are acceptable as long as they can fit in a standard case box slot (2.75 inches L x 2.75 in W x 9 in H; 7 cm x 7 cm x 22.9 cm).  Bottles with raised lettering are acceptable if they fit in a standard case box slot.


Bottles not meeting the above requirements will be disqualified. Entry fees will not be refunded for disqualified entries.

Attach bottle IDs to bottles with rubber bands.

Entry fee is $5 for the first entry and $3 for each additional entry.

Entries may be dropped off or mailed to:

Billings Homebrew Supply
1916 3rd Ave N  Billings, MT 59101
ATTN: Rimrock Brewers Guild

Entries will be accepted starting at 11am, Wednesday, July 10. The deadline for entry is 4pm, Wednesday, July 24, 2013.

If you are mailing your entry, find instructions on how to ship bottles here in the article "How to pack your beer".

Thank you for considering our competition, and Good Luck!



Thursday, February 21, 2013

Brewer Profile: Kenny Utz



Kenny Utz

Secretary



Home Town: Tulsa, Oklahoma

I've been a homebrewer since: I began home brewing in October of 2010.   My wife and I were looking for a hobby that we could both do together.  This topic would come up periodically while we were enjoying a beer.  Finally, one day, we looked down in our hands and decided that perhaps we should give a go at brewing.  We found a shop in San Antonio (where we were living at the time) that gave a free demonstration if you bought your equipment from them.  We brewed our first batch (a local pale ale clone) there in the homebrew shop and have not looked back since.
Do you have a homebrewing disaster you'd like to share? I believe it was the third batch that I had brewed. I was completing the brewing process and had made it to the cool down phase.  But, somehow I forgot this step all together and I transferred my hot wort directly into my fermentation bucket.  Instead of simply transferring it back, I attempted to cool down the wort where it was.  As you can imagine, plastic does not transfer heat very well.  I think it took an hour or so of having that bucket submerged in ice water in the sink to get it down to around 75oF.  My hands were quite cold after all the massaging I had to do to the side of that bucket.  I still chuckle when I think about it!
Kenny didn't send enough pictures for the blog, so I am forced to include this one for your entertainment.
What are your favorite styles to brew? I like to experiment too much to have a favorite style.  It seems every time I am perusing the BJCP style guidelines, I develop a new list of the “next beers I will brew”.  I think each style can be rewarding if it is well done (even sour ales).  Also, multiple styles require special techniques to brew them correctly and I enjoy trying my hand at those techniques (e.g. decoction mashing).  But, if you had to nail me down to the question, I have probably brewed saisons and IPAs the most.  I enjoy saisons because, like most Belgium beers, it is a yeast-forward beer.  So, it is often a surprise what the beer will taste like depending on the particular balance of the phenolic to estery ratio.  These beers continue to change with time, which I enjoy as a metaphor to life (I can see Jake rubbing his beard thoughtfully and contemplating that statement, Ha!).  I also enjoy the interplay of various hops.  
What style will you never brew? My least favorite style would be lite American lager, but I think each style has a place with someone at sometime, so it may be worth brewing at some time.  
What was the first beer you ever brewed?  How did it turn out? The first beer that I brewed was a kit that contained a clone recipe for Freetail Brewing’s Pale Ale.  I remember that it was not quite the same flavor as the actual beer, but I was impressed with how it turned out.  It is hard to compare the aroma/flavor to what I brew now, but I guess it was good enough to keep me brewing.  Or, maybe the equipment was expensive enough to keep me brewing, I am not sure.
Have you ever had a homebrew mistake that turned out great? Oh, man. That would be great.  No, I am not near that good or lucky where my mistakes end up being good.  Unfortunately my mistakes have all been mistakes, and even some of my non-mistakes have ended up tasting like mistakes. But if you are not screwing up at sometime, then you are not trying hard enough.  At least, that is what I tell myself.
What is your favorite beer recipe? I think my favorite beer recipe is one that results in an interplay of all the ingredients in beer while maintaining balance.  This is often difficult to achieve, especially because many beer styles necessitate a predominance of one particular ingredient.  Balance is quite elusive, but if it is achieved, then that recipe is definitely one worth keeping and brewing again.
Do you have a favorite homebrew trick or gadget that you've found to make your beer better/brewing easier? I think the aroma and flavor of teas are overlooked as brewing ingredients.  Every time I smell tea, I wonder what style of beer this would work in.  I try to incorporate teas in my beers if I can.
Describe your brew system. I utilize an all-grain brewing system.  I have a 20-quart pot that I use for heating hot liquor and my sparging water.  It built a mash/lauter tun out of a chest cooler using the sheath from a laundry hose connecter as my filter.  I have a 32-quart pot that I use for my kettle that I heat on a 55,000 BTU propane burner.  I also use a copper wort chiller and a large bucket that I fill with ice to cool my wort down while in the brew kettle.  
I would like to upgrade, but this system works pretty will for the five-gallon batches that I tend to brew.
How frequently do you brew? I try to brew at least 1-2 times per month.  If I could consume more beer, then I would brew more often.  
What is your favorite malt?  Why? I very much enjoy Maris Otter pale ale malt.  I think it has a very nice malty aroma and flavor and I tend to use this as a base malt for beers when the style includes a malty flavor.
What is your favorite hop? Why? This has changed so many times that it is probably not worth answering.  In generally, I tend to lean towards fruity/floral contributions from hopes and away from grassy/piney/herbal contribution.  But, I do enjoy a good mixture.  To me, the particular hops tend to change as you start combining them with each other, so it is hard to nail down one that is my favorite. 
What's the most unusual ingredient you've ever used in a brew? I brewed a kiwi-mango beer once.  It turned out ok, but the pieces of fruit were small enough to be siphoned into the bottling bucket, but they were definitely large enough to clog the bottling wand.  That was a pain in the a** to bottle.
Do you have any pets or kids named after beer styles or ingredients? Haha, not yet.  But that is an excellent idea that I am sure my wife will not appreciate.
How many medals have you won from homebrew competitions? None.  Maybe in the future, but I am glad to see that, as a club, we are starting to win some ribbons.  I would like to see our club continue to enter regional and national competitions.
Do you brew alone, with friends or with someone you live with? I brew with my wife when I can.  But, usually I brew alone.  
Are you an indoor or outdoor brewer? I remise to say that I am an outdoor brewer.  I loved brewing indoors because the smell hung around so well.  But, brewing is easier with a propane burner.  I had to move outdoors after I started using it.
List some of the names you've given your beers. Which is your favorite? Most recently, I brewed a pomegranate amber ale that I called Sekhmet’s Slumber after the Egyptian story of how beer saved the world from destruction by ending Sekhmet’s bloodlust by fooling her to think the pomegranate colored beer was blood and putting her to sleep after she drank too much of it.  I enjoy incorporating elements of brewing history with my names or having something witty enough to make people chuckle.  I called my Irish ale Stepchild Irish Red referring to the old saying about a “Redheaded Stepchild”.  I tend to use Summer Siesta for my herbed saison and Winter Solstice for the winter ale I brew each year.